Editions

Sacred art constitutes a valuable legacy of acknowledged cultural and cultic importance in the context of Portuguese religious heritage. The Catholic Church is its privileged owner, although one should also highlight other collections of lesser impact as regards the number of pieces, with material and technical quality that merit a mention (Coptic Church and others). Both the collections that are already museumised and those still being used in dioceses and parishes pose specific problems concerning their handling, packaging and security.

[Matrixes of Research in Decorative Arts V] Group of studies, integrants of doctoral projects in various fields of Decorative Arts, ranging from silver to gold jewelery, furniture to plaster, from hoist to the decorative environments, primarily since the 17th century to the 20th century.

[Matrixes of Research in Decorative Arts V] Group of studies, integrants of doctoral projects in various fields of Decorative Arts, ranging from silver to gold jewelery, furniture to plaster, from hoist to the decorative environments, primarily since the 17th century to the 20th century.

Facsimile edition of the catalogue of Casa Rosas & C.ª in Porto. In the transition from the 19th to the 20th century Casa Rosas & C.ª put on exhibitions and published catalogues of the items it sold, not only making it possible to divulge the objects sold, but today serves to provide accurate information about these items. CIONP carried out and published two facsimile editions with preliminary studies of two Porto goldsmiths’ catalogues, mainly from the first half of the 19th century, which constitute an important and very interesting source for the study of the production of 19th century Portuguese and Porto jewellery, under the titles “O Livro de Desenhos de Jóias de José António Mourão (1792-1856), da Rua das Flores, no Porto” and “Álbum de Desenhos de Jóias Portuguesas (ca. 1830-1930)”.

Porto was a merchant city that expanded greatly in the 16th century and accumulated great wealth, which was owned by a considerable number of its citizens and by other inhabitants of the city. In 1609, the Pragmatic of Philip II of Portugal ordered the mandatory registration of the items owned by these people, which included the indication of their names and addresses. This document is extremely important for information pertaining mainly to the 16th century silver and jewellery in the city, ot uses and customs, and by whom and where such items were utilised. It is thus possible to understand the role of these objects in the day to day life of the various levels of Porto society; information at national level about the period in question is uncommon.

This trip through the streets of Porto via the commentaries, narratives and observations presented by Alberto Pimentel in his book O Porto há 30 anos, originally published in 1893, allows us to see a city where the author presents us with a panorama of collective happiness. No Porto citizen should be deprived of reading this book. The great pity is that it took 120 years after it was first printed for it again to see the light of day. This Porto, which Alberto Pimentel portrayed in different ways, is the city with which he was profoundly involved in his youth. This work constitutes a veritable book of memoirs. We are shown society, in the cultivated and the mundane dimension, described by the delightfully expressive pen of Alberto Pimentel, with stories of characters, customs and attitudes that reveal a Porto with a lot to tell.

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